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Please Check This Sign for "I'm good."


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Hi,

I'm a novelist, and in one of my series, I have a deaf character.

Here are a few sentences from my latest book. Could someone confirm that I am describing this ASL correctly?

    Carly’s eyes also filled with tears, something that rarely happens. One spilled down her cheek. “I’m okay with those photos, but what about you, bro?”

    I pointed to my chest and slid my hand down, then put the four fingers of my right hand against my chin and pulled them away into the palm of my left: I’m good.

My concern is that that's really in PSE (Pidgin Signed English) rather than ASL. That is, with ASL syntax, he would sign "Good I am."

What do you think?

Many thanks!

Al

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

' I poked my chest with my index finger, then pointed my right closed fingered hand against my chin, pulled it down to my left palm that was awaiting in front of my stomach: I'm good. ' (ASL) 

 

Born deaf- Growing up in the deaf culture, we didn't sign "Good, I am." We always sign "Good." Or "I'm good."

Edited by Jo Wright
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One ASL speaker (who learned ASL as an adult) told me this (In Conclusive Evidence) was wrong:

"Carly thinks that is a particularly wussy thing to do. The ASL sign for “chicken” is formed by making a beak shape with your fingers and pecking it down onto the other hand."

The woman said that that sign wouldn't be used to call someone chicken (as in "scared"). So, I'll be interested in your take.

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In our culture, all we have to do is sign that exact signal as you mentioned above to get in fights. ( We barely even manage to get the beak to touch our other hands before they attack. ) By the time it hit year 2000- we all grew smart enough to just make a beak shape, and leave it by our jaws. We knew we wouldn't make it, and we knew we were asking for it. 

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