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kellyanngood

The reason I'm learning sign language

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Hi my name is Kelly, July of 2018 I woke up deaf in my right ear. Over the next 2 months I lost my hearing in my left ear. I've know a little sign language my whole life but not enough to get by. I think sign language is beautiful and I always wanted to become fluent. I didn't think it would happen this way though. I'm adjusting, it's definitely been a struggle. 

Kelly

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I can relate to your struggles because basically the same thing happened to me I have Meniere's disease so I can only barely hear out of my right ear but I'm completely deaf in my left ear and no one in my family signs though so I am forced to talk.

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Hi Kelly, 

my niece did the same. Woke up deaf. 

I have a brother that lost all hearing while on active duty, and I've lost 70% in the left ear and about 30% in the right. But, since I used to work with the Regional School for the Deaf, I remember some sign. Now, I want to become fluent in ASL. It's not a necessity, but I'm in an area where about 10% of our population is Deaf. 

I appreciate your story and can understand. Personally, I do not prefer the sounds of the outside world. 

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On 2/22/2019 at 8:49 PM, Beto said:

Hi Doc. I'm decided to learn ASL after my mom passed away from Alzheimer's, as did all of her siblings. While taking care of her I found research that indicated doing those things that actually "re-wire the brain" have shown to diminish the likelihood of getting Alzheimer's; learning a new language is one of those activities that actually does rewire the brain.

I'm just beginning my third semester learning ASL, and like you, am working to become fluent. Would like to know if you'd be interested in practicing together; I'm on Skype, Facetime, and can easily download Glide if you'd prefer.

 

Take care, welcome, and hope to hear from you soon. Sincerely, Beto

I'm an educator, and I can attest to this fact. I sign, speak fluent English and Spanish. When we force ourselves to do things outside our comfort zone, it changes us.  There is what is called "total communications". I've used it to teach mentally challenged students. 

They "see" the words. They "say" the words. They "sign" the words, then spell the words. Each step cements that specific word in their brain to a much higher degree. Again, total communications. 

For me, I'm  HOH, and I worked with Deaf kids before. Somehow, I stopped following my passion.

🙂 Time to make this happen. 

Gracias Beto 🙂

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