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A.S.L in graphic novels.


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I am a writer who is currently working on a graphic novel about the family structures of two disabled boys. One of the characters is hearing impaired.
I am interested in learning how to structure a few sentences in sign language 
in order to give my book a more authentic feel. 
I need help with translations. Things like, "i play the guitar" 
 

I need someone to practice with.  

If you are interested drop me line. 

Thank you!

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So, I'm gonna be a little bit of a di*k.  This is kind of offensive.  And you'll end up pissing off Deaf people doing this.  This is at it's best cultural appropriation and at worst it's audism.  This is taking a culture that you apparently know nothing about.  A language that you obviously know nothing about.  And then using those things for your own personal gain.  If you want your graphic novel about deaf people.  Why they need to be deaf, I don't know. Unless you're just using it because you feel your characters need to have a disability, and deaf was the winner of the day.  But how are you going to give your book an "authentic feel" if you can't bother to take the time to learn enough about a culture to say a basic sentence?  Do your own work.  Learn it, like everyone else has had to.  Spend some time with a deaf person.  Learn who they are as people and then you can speak, as an outsider, to their culture.  But to just ask someone to do work for you so you can gain from another culture is a little offensive.

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  • 1 month later...

I kind of agree with Lysandor. The grammar of the sentence about the guitar is different in ASL, but what would be the purpose of writing it as he signs it. He means he is plays the guitar, so write the sentence as "I play the guitar". It does show your ignorance to think that by writing it in ASL gloss show the language. It doesn't. I have a feeling Lysandor is Deaf or is very involved in the deaf community because he gave the perfect answer. Deaf people don't even consider themselves disabled so again, your ignorance shows. If you do still write a book after you find someone who won't be fully honest with you, I think it will flop. It certainly wont attract the Deaf community and those who know and love them. If you want to write in ASL, (which is ridiculous, because it isn't a written language), go to school and learn it like the rest of us did, and you will have a completely different perspective. Best of luck to you. and if you are still bent on using two "disabled" characters, pick a real disability. Deafness is not a disability.

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  • 7 months later...

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