Lysandor

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Everything posted by Lysandor

  1. Yeah. It's an app for your smartphone. You have to have a decent camera. The app should be in whatever phone you uses app download program. It's called Glide. Just download it and it will set up a username or have you create one. Androids seem to force a ridiculous username on you. Download the app and you can find a couple different groups to chat with. Facebook has a few groups for beginner ASL users who want to sign with each other. I'm part of a practice group, though we're closing in on our 50 member max.
  2. I kind of took the same languages you did. I took 4 years of French and 4 years of Spanish. Not that I could use it anymore.
  3. You guys should get on Glide and exchange usernames. That way you don't have to set up times that you are signing together. You can then sign with each other at your convenience.
  4. Hi, NICE MEET YOU. I think we're all here for the same kids of things. I'd be happy to get with you on here or on Glide at some point to practice. Though I'm only at ASL 2. So I don't know what help I'd really be to you. I tend to sign more PSE as well since I'm just not exposed to many deaf people. Well, at least not to the point where I fell comfortable asking someone to help me learn better.
  5. I am mostly here for the same reasons. I am learning through a few classes online, and I'm taking a class this fall at my local community college. So I need people to practice with. I belong to a Glide group that is for practicing. There are few people on there who are learning to become interpreters and there are a few deaf people there as well. Though they don't tend to contribute as much. One guy who seems to help them most is a CODA. Let me know if you want to join the group, I can add you.
  6. Hi Megan. There are chat rooms here for use to practice. Though they're not very well populated. There's also Glide. I know of a few ASL practice chat groups on there. Good luck.
  7. Good luck with learning. There are a few websites that could really help. Lifeprint.com is good. Startasl.com has an actual online curriculum youcan take. ASL Practice is a Facebook group with a Glide group chat that can help you learn. There are a lot of ways to learn.
  8. Hi Betty. Where are you local to? What kind of doctor services do you need?
  9. Harrisburg Area Community College offers a two part non-credit ASL class in the fall. The course description for the two classes are as below. I am taking the Sign Language I class in the fall so I can't really give any information on how good of a class this will be. I'll probably come back and write a review of the course once I've completed it. Sign Language I This course focuses on an overview of American Sign Language (ASL), designed for students with little to no background in ASL. Students will learn basic vocabulary, structure, syntax, grammar and sentence structure... Campus Harrisburg Campus Date(s) Offered 09/14/2017 Cost $149.00 More Information Sign Language II Sign Language II continues using the Signing Naturally (2008) curriculum. Units 4, 5, and 6 will be covered, including family, activities, and residency topics... Campus Harrisburg Campus Date(s) Offered 09/05/2017 Cost $149.00 More Information
  10. I've been using this program for a few weeks. It's been very helpful. The cost is relatively low. It's basically $10 a month to access their content and then you can learn at your own pace. They have 3 different courses with different levels of course work per unit. I'm still on course 1 and I'm only halfway through and I've already learned a lot. It's basically set as a class format. You learn content, do practice modules, watch videos of conversations to try and learn to follow, then take a quiz on that content.
  11. What is the purpose of the ASL Practice Zone? There doesn't seem to be any content there.
  12. I'm learning ASL essentially because of my job. I work as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist/CT Tech for a local hospital. It's happened a few times now that I have had some dear or hoh patients and haven't been able to help them without the assistance of a video interpreter or someone from the Easter Seals coming with the patient. I had a patient recently with a cochlear implant who was able to understand me while she had he device on, but with the CT machine and scanning peoples heads, the device has to be detached for the scan. Once that thing came off, I no longer had the ability to communicate my instructions. It was frustrating for me, and I'm sure it was frustrating for my patient. There are other reasons as well. About a year ago I was hanging out with a group of friends. We were at a bar. One of my friend's boyfriend is deaf. Only his b/f and he knew ASL. During the course of the night the two of them got into an argument. At one point my friend, who is hearing started ignoring his b/f. His b/f was frantically signing to him, trying to communicate. We couldn't help because none of us were able to sign. At one point my friend turned his back on his b/f and was talking with us while ignoring his b/f. The rest of us felt awful, but really didn't know what to do because there was no way for us to sign with him to in any way comfort him, or even understand what the argument was about. I also felt as though my friend used our ability to hear as a means of emotional abuse of his b/f. Not cool. I felt like this situation could have had a better outcome if others of us had been able to sign; also, if my friend wasn't a complete dick. So those are my reasons for learning. I don't feel like other people should be prevented from communicating with me because I didn't take the time to learn something challenging.
  13. Good morning, So, my name is Travis. I'm learning ASL through the startasl website for the time being and will be taking ASL classes this fall and next spring. I'm learning ASL to help with my patients. I work for a hospital and have had three interactions recent with deaf or hoh patients that I have had to use a tablet on wheels with a video interpreter. That was a great experience and tool, but it was only valuable while I had the interpreter on the line. Once I got my patient into the room to work with them, I was no longer able to communicate my instructions due to my lack of knowledge of ASL. So I made it a point to try and learn.